As I embarked on the project to redesign the Lumo Lift, I wanted to get a sense of the most prominent and pressing issues that users of the current app faced. To that end, I conducted informal user research to gather app feedback from a variety of inputs, categorize and prioritize the issues, and then present solutions to work into the redesign.

The research below warrants further, more rigorous study, but it uncovered many large usability blocks and provides a good directional starting point for revisiting the design of the Lumo Lift app.

View Lumo Lift App Redesign

Methodology

Two data sources were used: in-person testing and online customer reviews.

The in-person testing involved 3 testers, who all expressed interest in correcting their posture and potentially buying the Lumo Lift. I observed them as they went through the set up process with the Lumo Lift app on their own devices, and they borrowed and used the Lumo Lift throughout at least 2 full days. At the end of that period, they reported any usability issues that they encountered and answered questions regarding their usage of the main features of the app.

To supplement in-person testing, I looked at all of the reviews for the Lumo Lift app on iTunes as well as the Google Play store, up to the end of February 2016. I also surveyed reviews from Amazon, but due to sheer volume and the fact that most reviews were for the Lumo Lift hardware as opposed to the app, I only looked at the month of February 2016. From these reviews, I picked out those that were critical of some aspect of the app and/or had suggestions for improvements.

Combining the data from these sources, I grouped them by topic and assigned priority based on frequency, urgency, and magnitude of impact on the experience.

Legend

HIGH priority: Issues which have a substantial negative impact on the experience of many users. These relate directly to the core functionality of the product, and should be address as soon as possible.

MEDIUM priority: Issues which have also been noted by many users, but nice-to-haves that don’t impact the core experience.

LOW priority: Issues that may be one-off occurrences, or are unsubstantiated. Warrants further investigation. Noted in case similar cases may arise in the future.

I. Data Reporting & Trends

The trends page currently shows a bar graph of the percentage of good posture within the hour, but does not drill deeper. 2 testers mentioned that they wanted to see a breakdown of good and bad posture by the minute, and 2 customers directly commented on it in their reviews: (1) “My main complaint is that I can’t get more detail about my activity. It would be great to know if there are times when I slouch more, or what my activity curve looks like.” (2) “I would be more inclined to use the app if it showed more stats, like my current posture or how many minutes of good posture I’ve had so far that day.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Allow the user to see a breakdown of good and bad posture for each minute of the hour.

4 customer reviews mentioned errors with data loss from the previous days. Either history from previous days does not show up, or as one mentioned, “I keep falling asleep without syncing it one last time and the next morning the stats from the day before are gone.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Make sure that history data is stored and accurately displaying. Also extend the length of memory in the physical device itself so that it can retain data for two days, in case the user forgets to sync it overnight.

The “Trends” button is located at the bottom lefthand corner of the screen. 2 testers were unaware of the trends page. Before being guided to it, one expressed the desire to see something exactly like the trends page, with posture by the hour. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Surface the trends page by placing the link somewhere more prominent, or putting some data directly on the main page with a link to easily access the rest of it.

9 customer reviews commented that the app lacks a way to view or compare data over long stretches of time, in order to see progress. One mentioned, “Some history display aka FitBit would be useful,” and another wrote, “Chart comparisons would be great or more details.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: The trends page has graphs that compare hourly posture and daily posture, but it appears that customers may not be discovering the latter, or may still find it difficult to use for comparisons. Progress can also be tracked via other data like the duration of continuous good posture or the number of buzzes per hour, as suggested by a tester.

2 testers had difficulty reading and interpreting the trends graph. One remarked that it is extra work to see the value for each hour, and searched for the 100% mark. Another noted that “Crossing the dotted [40% goal] line seems wrong.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Redesign the graph to make the labels clearer.

II. Units of Measurement, Good Posture Hour

None of the 3 testers were aware that they were being measured in “good posture hours,” and they guessed different interpretations of a “good posture hour” because there was no formal introduction during on boarding. Two testers thought it was a straight hour of good posture, whereas one thought it was a combined hour of good posture that could be spread across several hours. Good posture hours are only explained in the online FAQ, and nowhere in the app itself. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: If the metric of good posture hours is to be used, it should be introduced upfront in the on boarding sequence, and the basis for using this metric over others should be explained. Users should also be able to adjust their definition of a good posture hour from the standard one of 40% of the hour.

An hour only counts as a good posture hour when the user has had good posture for at least 40% of the hour. That means that one could reach 39% for 12 hours, but still have 0 good posture hours. In addition, good posture for 40% and 99% of the hour are both recorded the same way, as 1 good posture hour. All 3 testers remarked that the good posture hour metric could be improved: (1) “posture hours is a bit ambiguous;”  (2) “it’s not a very intuitive metric;” (3) it’s “just the total,” want something more granular. 4 customer reviews expressed frustration at the use of “good posture hours” as a metric. One pointed out the lack of context: “…it will tell you “5 hours of good posture”. Swell, but five hours compared to what? Did I only wear the thing for five hours, or did I use it for sixteen hours?” Another lamented that it records 0 hours if one is below the 40% goal line: “I love the concept of the device but only seeing zero hours of good posture despite having the coach turned on is discouraging. I would like to see more minute-to-minute data to stay motivated.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Another, or many other more intuitive metrics for tracking posture could be introduced, such as a count of the total number of minutes of good posture, the longest string of continuous good posture, number of buzzes per hour, etc. This would give more motivation to those who are starting out and struggle with reaching the targeted 40% good posture in an hour, and it would also offer those who consistently exceed the target a way to quantify their achievements (providing a distinction between 40% and 99% of the hour).

A “good posture hour” is defined as being in good posture for 40% of the hour, but there is no given basis for the 40%, and users are unable to adjust this number. 1 tester remarked that “40% sounds low, I would assume it would be 60% or 70%.” He also attempted to tap and drag the dotted 40% line on the trends page in order to adjust it. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: If the metric of good posture hours is to be used, the basis for selecting 40% of the hour as the default should be explained upfront. In addition, users should be able to adjust this number if they have different goals or as they get better posture and seek extra challenge.

III. Coach & Delay

Realtime reporting on posture is a key feature of the Lift, but it is hidden under two layers (Coach > Enable Vibrations > Test Delay), and the pathway to it is not obvious. 1 tester asked, “is there a live view like fitbit?” after having tested the Lift for a day. 3 customer reviews spoke of this issue: (1) “Can not see the realtime status.” (2) “the app is supposed to have a screen that IMO is incorrectly hidden behind “Test the Delay” button.” (3) “At the minimum you’d expect a realtime easy UI that shows you whether you’re slouching or not, and some constant realtime counter of your good posture time. The device can do it as there’s a setting scree that does this sort of but it’s cumbersome to get to.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Surface the realtime reporting feature, either to the main page or under an easily accessible and intuitive link on the main page.

There are two potential instances of this occurring: (1) when the user first uses the Lift, doesn’t absorb onboarding instructions for turning Coach mode on and off, and accidentally turns it off; or (2) when the user turns Coach mode off deliberately and then forgets about it later on or when s/he puts it on again. Latter observed for 1 tester and in 1 review. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Push notification after a certain time interval (which the user can set) for which the Lift is worn with Coach mode turned off. Perhaps only when the Lift is picked up and worn all while Coach mode is off, as opposed to if the user turns Coach mode off while wearing it. The notification would contain a question (i.e. “Would you like Coach mode to be on?”) with an actionable button to turn Coach mode on if the user so desires.

When first setting the delay, the app  messages, “We strongly recommend a 2 minute delay.” However, as 1 tester questioned, “Why? What is the basis?” The explanation for the number is not part of that screen, or anywhere else in the app or online. None of the 3 testers followed the recommendation, with 2 setting the delay to 30 seconds and 1 setting it to 15 seconds. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Add an explanation for the recommended 2 minute setting to this page.

Isolated occurrence for 1 tester, it appears that most people understand through the on boarding video or as soon as they open the Coach page. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Rename “Coach” to something more specific and intuitive. One tester suggestion is “silent mode.”

The true function of “Test the Delay” is realtime reporting, but the name does not directly convey this. 1 tester mentioned that the “Delay” does not seem like the right word, as it may seem like the device is slow and has negative connotations. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Rename “Delay” to something more specific and intuitive. One user suggestion is “sensitivity.”

IV. Onboarding

Although not observed with any of the 3 testers, this problem cropped up in customer reviews. 3 customers complained that if the sensor disconnects from the device, they have to log in and go through the entire set up process each time. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: The disconnection mentioned by the customers seems to be a bug, but it would help to add a “Skip” button to the on boarding screens for those who have already been through the process and are familiar with the Lift, but either are connecting it to a new device or were disconnected.

1 customer review praised the app because it “explains the proper way to wear the lift.” However, 2 other reviews remarked that the directions are minimal, and 1 other suggested information that could be added, such as instructions to “double tap to reset the lumo when I go from standing to sitting.” (Appendix)

SOLUTION: This could potentially be just isolated opinion, and there was only one specific suggestion on what information could be included to make the on boarding instructions more robust.

1 tester missed the instructions in the on boarding sequence on how to align the Lift and became confused when he tried to tap once to align. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: The on boarding sequence goes through steps carefully and deliberately, but there is always the risk that someone may miss certain instructions. It isn’t worth overhauling the entire on boarding sequence to accommodate these individuals, but this is something to keep an eye on, especially because it takes some time to get familiar with the types of taps and their functions.

V. Steps & Calories

There are conflicting opinions as to whether or not step and calorie data are accurate. 5 customers reviewed that steps and calories are either off-base or, in the case of steps, better tracked with tools specifically designed to track steps. However, 1 tester demonstrated that step count on the Lift was almost the same as that on his iPhone Health app, and at least 1 customer review directly noted that step count was accurate. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: It is likely that those who had no problems with the step and calorie data are less likely to leave a review than those who experienced issues. However, given that multiple complaints exist, it is worthwhile to investigate the accuracy of the data because if steps and calories are to be offered at all, they must be accurate to standards that users are already used to from other tools in order for the user to trust the Lift in general.

The primary function of the device is to measure posture, and users appear divided as to whether the steps and calorie counters are useful additions. Some users appreciate them: 1 tester called the addition of step tracking “very beneficial.” The purpose of the Lift was to track posture, but he liked that steps were integrated because it reinforces that you are overall active. 1 customer review also explicitly mentioned that “the steps and calorie tracker is also a nice bonus.” However, others do not see much value in them: 1 tester didn’t understand why the Lift tracked steps and places equal importance on steps as on posture in the app’s design. He already uses other apps to track steps, which another customer review echoed as well. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: More research is needed to determine the usefulness of the step and calorie counters. The functionality already exists, so there must be some strategic reasoning behind its inclusion. However, for the development and release of future features, the focus should remain on posture, as long as the step and calorie counters remain well-maintained and functional.

VI. Miscellaneous

1 customer wrote a review expressing difficulty in finding how to change the password. 1 other customer remarked that “changing goals would be great…”, which is already possible to do within settings but potentially overlooked. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: These are isolated complaints, but in a redesign of settings and the app menu, highly used settings can be surfaced and access to the other settings can also be made easier.

To set up and “personalize” the Lift, the app requires that the user input name, age, gender, height, and weight. 1 tester commented that he did not understand the relevancy of weight, and would prefer not to divulge it unless it was useful. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Currently, there is no indication of why weight, height, and age are being asked for. A user’s information should only be requested when it can be used to benefit the user (i.e. for reporting and data comparisons), and the reason should be explicit when it is being requested. If the information is indeed used, a simple line of text stating “This information will be used for/to…” would be an effective solution.

4 customer reviews suggested some method of customizing Lift vibration: 2 because they sometimes couldn’t feel the buzz, 1 because the buzz is sometimes disruptive to others around, and 1 as a method to buzz in order to find the Lift. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: The intensity and duration of vibration must have been arrived at via extensive testing, and the topic warrants more research. However, this is a potential additional feature to consider.

VI. Bugs

2 reviews commented that the date within the app was wrong, and there was no way to set the app date to the correct one. (Appendix)

SOLUTION: Without context, it’s unclear whether this issue may be a result of the app or the phone date settings. However, it could be a potential bug, and it may be worthwhile to look into including the date in the settings just in case.

1 customer review mentioned this issue, and I confirmed it to be true. (Appendix)

At least 2 customer reviews complained that the sensor disconnects without warning, though no context is given. (Appendix)

After going for a run, 1 tester experienced an error when syncing the Lift to his phone and saw only his statistics for the previous day. Later on, his step data showed up in the app, but his posture data was lost. A potential reason that he attributed the error to was that he wore a seatbelt before the run, which was constantly pressing on the Lift. (Appendix)

1 customer review mentioned this issue, but it could be an isolated occurrence and no context was given, so it might not be device error. (Appendix)

Appendix: Original Notes & Quotes

1. (HIGH) Not enough detail on trends page

Should break down within the hour what was good and what was bad posture (Tester 1)

Wants to see breakdown of minutes of good and bad posture when tapping on a specific hour (Tester 3)

Nice overall, but would like more details I like the lift itself, and I do think my posture is better. My main complaint is that I can’t get more detail about my activity. It would be great to know if there are times when I slouch more, or what my activity curve looks like… (Ted Copeland 1/16/16 Android)

…I would be more inclined to use the app if it showed more stats, like my current posture or how many minutes of good posture I’ve had so far that day. I love the concept of the device but only seeing zero hours of good posture despite having the coach turned on is discouraging. I would like to see more minute-to-minute data to stay motivated. (Colleen Dillon 1/14/16 Android)

.

2. (HIGH) App is not saving history data/history data is buggy

App is not saving data from past days Even though I wear and sync my lumo loft everyday the app is not saving the data. Right now when I click to see the previous days step count and good posture hours it shows the previous day as January 28th (Maddie Pearson 2/9/16 Android)

Pretty good, but room for improvement My posture is a lot better after a couple weeks and the pedometer is a nice extra little feature. My only complaint is I wish it would automatically sync at the end of the day. I keep falling asleep without syncing it one last time and the next morning the stats from the day before are gone. (Justin Troxell 1/29/16 Android)

…Also, sometimes when I look at previous days, the most recent 1-3 days are missing. They always come in later, but it’s frustrating that I can’t see them right away. (Ted Copeland 1/16/16 Android)

…The bad: – it’s missing the history… (Jaroslav Sladek 7/18/15 Android)

.

3. (HIGH) Trends page is undiscoverable

Did not find trends (Tester 1)

Didn’t notice trends page, was talking about wanting a screen that displayed the posture by hour before I pointed out trends (Tester 3)

.

4. (HIGH) Data is difficult to compare, hard to track progress

Show milestones: the longest string of good posture, how many times the Lift vibrated per hour, etc. (Tester 3)

I do agree with the reviewer who says there are not enough options for capturing data over long periods of time and displaying said data, along, of course, then with some method of back up or whatever. (Docinla 6/10/15 iPhone)

Not too many choices for viewing data over long stretches of time. (SG NY 2/11/15 iPhone)

Chart comparisons would be great or more details. (prophetx2 8/15/14 iPhone)

Some history display aka FitBit would be useful. (Jayperkins 8/30/14 iPhone)

Hopefully there’s more to it and better history capture as they iterate. (JaySeeG 8/19/14 iPhone)

But it took me a while to realize that it doesn’t stay continually connnected to the phone and that I have to re-sync tmy data manually. I would also like to see comparisons between days. (Beenlouis 8/17/14 iPhone)

It would be great to have a chart to see progress, and even some exercises to help improve posture. (Peachy8199 8/16/15 iPhone)

But the app does not offer much details and control on what you see. There is essentially one screen. There is no comparison chart of my daily activities. No explanation for some of the numbers, like calorie count. I have been using Lumo lift for an hour in the morning, and the calorie count is already 800kcal. (Ventcrazy 8/14/15 iPhone)

They really need spend some time fine tuning the app and making it more in depth: easier to see progress, etc (DFitLife 8/20/14 iPhone)

.

5. (MED) Trends graph markings are unclear

Trends page – I don’t know what it’s telling me. “Crossing the dotted line seems wrong” (but it’s supposed to be the goal) (Tester 2)

Extra work to see the value for each hour, not intuitive. Where is the 100% mark? Tell me the value right away as an overlay. (Tester 3)

.

6. (HIGH) No introduction to the concept of good posture hours

Unaware of “good posture hour” (Tester 1)

When discovered, thought it meant 7 hrs straight of good posture (Tester 1)

“Didn’t notice they weren’t regular hours” (Tester 2)

Interprets it as a whole hour without slouching at all (Tester 2)

Interprets it as four hours of good posture combined, not straight (Tester 3)

What defines an hour as being in good posture? Any time the sensor is not vibrating = good posture (Tester 3)

.

7. (HIGH) Good posture hour is not a useful metric

Posture hours is a bit ambiguous. The metric would be good if it was comparative. Good posture for a 15 year old vs. 30 year old or comparing friends or comparing the performance everyday (Tester 1)

Oh I actually didn’t do find it very useful, it’s not a very intuitive metric. Also I thought I had good posture for the whole hour not just 40%. I would like to see good posture plotted on a curve over time, either over a day or multiple days. That’s what I like about the Fitbit (Tester 2)

For me, [good posture hours are] not useful. Want to know when are the hours I have good posture. It’s just the total, want something more granular. I asked if minutes instead of hours would be useful, he said, “Yeah, that would be nice,” and you could use that to create trends. (Tester 3)

The App is absolutely necessary; without it, the device won’t help you much. I like that you can customize the Delay Time (that is, how long you slouch before it buzzes.) I’m not certain just how accurate the Pedometer function is, but it actually seems pretty close. I would like to see an additional feature: the PERCENTAGE OF TIME that your posture is good. Right now it will tell you “5 hours of good posture”. Swell, but five hours compared to what? Did I only wear the thing for five hours, or did I use it for sixteen hours? (Lawrence Denburg 2/20/16)

Five days in I have trouble with the lumo lift staying linked to my phone (galaxy s6) so throughout the day I can’t see updates on my posture or even turn the coach on and off. I would be more inclined to use the app if it showed more stats, like my current posture or how many minutes of good posture I’ve had so far that day. I love the concept of the device but only seeing zero hours of good posture despite having the coach turned on is discouraging. I would like to see more minute-to-minute data to stay motivated. (Colleen Dillon 1/14/16)

I love my lumo lift. It’s definitely helped me be self aware of my posture or lack of it. The device is brilliant and slick. But the app is atrocious. It’s like 2 totally different companies did the HW and the SW. At the minimum you’d expect a realtime easy UI that shows you whether you’re slouching or not, and some constant realtime counter of your good posture time. The device can do it as there’s a setting scree that does this sort of but it’s cumbersome to get to. As for tracking, it shows hours. What a worthless measure. Imagine if your treadmill only told you how many hours you’ve run for. Yep, no updates until you complete an hour. That’s ridiculous. Give me an Apple Watch glimpse that’s red or green and has a counting seconds timer to show good posture time this hour or this day. (Dennis Q 1/14/16)

While “good posture hours” isn’t a datapoint you are going to get much use from in other applications, all day step data is. (Arcos9000 11/12/14)

.

8. (MED) Unable to redefine good posture hour as anything other than 40%

Tried to move 40% line in trends, should be able to change it there. There was nowhere that explained a good posture hour or the 40%. 40% seems low, would assume 60% or 70% (Tester 3)

.

9. (HIGH) Delay functionality is hidden

“Is there a live view like fitbit?” Didn’t navigate to test delay on his own (Tester B)

Good hardware but poor software. Can not see the realtime status. (Qiuwch 12/19/15 iPhone)

…it is really hard to calibrate this thing. The app is supposed to have a screen that IMO is incorrectly hidden behind “Test the Delay” button. And there is a glitch – if you leave/forget the app in the “Test delay” screen (which actually is hte only screen where you get live feedback whether Lumo thinks you are standing up tall or slouching) your Lumo stops giving you feedback…” (Py 6y 8/26/15 iPhone)

…At the minimum you’d expect a realtime easy UI that shows you whether you’re slouching or not, and some constant realtime counter of your good posture time. The device can do it as there’s a setting scree that does this sort of but it’s cumbersome to get to… (Dennis Q 1/14/16 iPhone)

.

10. (MED) User is unaware that coach has been turned off

A short while after setting up the lift, mentioned that it was “not accurate” — didn’t buzz even when he knew he was slouching. I mentioned that coach may have been off: Why would it turn off? If you don’t want it on, just take it off. Don’t get why it’s not always on. (Tester B)

Downsides are that once you settle into the couch for the evening and you shut the “coach” off so that it stops the constant buzzing, you need to remember to turn it back on in the morning. It would be nice if there was a timer function where it would re-activate into coach mode after 4 hours or so. (Chad G. Swindall 2/17/16 Amazon)

.

11. (MED) No explanation for why 2 minutes is the recommended delay

Recommend 2 minute delay, but why? What is the basis, don’t know the basis (Tester 1)

.

12. (LOW) ‘Coach’ mode name may cause confusion

“What is coach mode? …That’s confusing, it’s just the whole functionality…Call it “silent mode” instead” (Tester B)

.

13. (LOW) ‘Delay’ name may cause confusion

“Delay” is not the right word, it seems like the device is just slow. Maybe “buffer” or “sensitivity” instead? (Tester 2)

.

14. (MED) Every time the Lift disconnects, the user has to go through the entire set up process again and log in

the unit is pretty decent and works effectively. However, the app is absolutely terrible. It keeps asking me to log in every single time. Moreover there are no instructions to guide you… (SIMnSHA 2/16/16 iPhone)

Why do I have to keep entering all my info every time I get disconnected. I don’t understand why I have to sign back out to reconnect!!?? (Jpark1031 2/2/16 iPhone)

About 5 or 6 times a day the sensor disconnects and then it forces me to not only log out, but there is no ‘remember me’ button which is a pain….Then it makes you go through the ENTIRE setup process over and over again. I know how to realign the lift, thank you very much. (iiiLover 9/12/15 iPhone)

.

15. (LOW) Not enough information in the on boarding sequence

Small learning curve that I’m suppose to double tap to reset the lumo when I go from standing to sitting. Adding that to their intro guide would be a good idea. (Jason Tipson 2/11/16 Android)

I really like the app and how it explains the proper way to ewear the lift. It also gives pretty good stats and reminders about your posture. (Maine0801 4/7/15 iPhone)

Was the company trying to be minimalist? There’s very little info on how to use it. (broadwaykid38 9/29/14 iPhone)

The directions are as minimal as the app… (JaySeeG 8/19/14 iPhone)

.

16. (LOW) Users may miss information in on boarding sequence

Missed directions to tap twice to align, tried tapping once but did not receive any response. Didn’t attempt to turn coach off and on, and didn’t realize later that the Coach was turned off until noted that it wasn’t vibrating (Tester 3)

.

17. (MED) Steps and calories are not accurate

Steps are fairly accurate, based on comparison with iPhone Health app (Tester 3)

The calorie counter isn’t useful. When I put it on most mornings it says I’ve burned 500+ calories. Nope. (Klatour 2/21/15 iPhone)

Constant issues of incorrect tracking The fact that this app/product has literally two functions, and one of them is constantly inaccurate, is infuriating. Several times the number of steps has reverted overnight and doesn’t reflect the last sync before the lift is put to sleep. I’ll go to sleep and have 11,000 steps for Tuesday, wake up and review my steps and it’s at 9,899 or whatever the 2nd to last sync was. The fact that you can’t contact the company via the app is an indication that customer service is nonexistent. Waste. (Katherine S 2/3/16 Android)

Pretty good Better posture and very accurate step counter. The only problem I’m having is that sometimes the buzzing is loud enough to be disruptive to those around me (like in a small meeting room). (Sarah Hutchins 1/28/16 Android)

My only complaint would be that the step counter can’t be turned off on the app (my phone has GPS and does that sort of thing better), and it doesn’t integrate with any other health tracking apps. (Brian Wheller 9/23/15)

But the app does not offer much details and control on what you see. There is essentially one screen. There is no comparison chart of my daily activities. No explanation for some of the numbers, like calorie count. I have been using Lumo lift for an hour in the morning, and the calorie count is already 800kcal. (Ventcrazy 8/14/15 iPhone)

Where it fails is its complete lack of integration with other applications, including HealthKit. While “good posutre hours” isn’t a datapoint you are going to get much use from in other applications, all day step data is. (Arcos9000 11/12/14 iPhone)

The app crashed and lost all my data. The activitiy tracker does not seem accurate in steps and definitely not calories…There’s no way to see progress over time more than 6-8 hours. (Ferardxx 8/31/14 iPhone)

.

18. (LOW) Steps and calories are extras

Didn’t understand why the app was counting steps too, since he already uses other apps to track that. And the Lumo Lift app places equal importance on steps and posture. (Tester 1)

Bought for posture, but like that steps are integrated. It reinforces that you’re overall active, conscious about both posture and how active you are. “Very beneficial” (Tester 3)

Really good product and feel that the gentle reminder to sit/stand properly is helping me. The steps and calorie tracker is also a nice bonus, as is the app which shows you your progress throughout the day. (Chad G. Swindall 2/17/16 Amazon)

My only complaint would be that the step counter can’t be turned off on the app (my phone has GPS and does that sort of thing better), and it doesn’t integrate with any other health tracking apps. (Brian Wheller 9/23/15 Android)

.

19. (MED) Difficult to access certain settings

Some iOS features not present I’m a bit disappointed that you can’t see hourly feedback like on the iPhone. Changing goals would be great too. It shouldn’t be hard to program really. (Naomi Pentrel 1/21/16 Android)

Took me a couple weeks to learn how to use it. Instructions unclear but staff very helpful. And now very happy with it. BTW, my original 2-star review was as follows: 1. To change password, the intructions say “You can do this under Menu > Settings > My Profile > Password.” Where is “menu” to be found? Can’t find it, at least not on the iPhone 6. (72 year old codger 7/19/15 iPhone)

.

20. (MED) Disclosing weight and birthday seems irrelevant

Why did it ask for weight? Does not want to divulge unless required. Understand relevancy of height. Suspicion of giving apps info in general. (Tester 1)

.

21. (LOW) Unable to change the duration and intensity of vibration

The reason I did not give five stars: Lumo Lift was great when I was sitting, but when I was walking for instance, I couldn’t feel the buzz-just like people tend to miss calls when their phone’s in the pocket on silent mode. (For the record, I wear snug fit cloths.) It would be really great if Lumo could adjust the intensity of vibration depending on whether a user is moving or not. (qnp1521 2/11/16)

Good product, app needs work The lumo lift itself is good. I would like to see settings for duration of vibrations cause sometimes I cant feel it. Also I hate how there is constant notification to “make sure I align…etc” in my top down bar. I cant remove it. There is potential but still needs more work. (Joon Park 2/3/16)

Pretty good Better posture and very accurate step counter. The only problem I’m having is that sometimes the buzzing is loud enough to be disruptive to those around me (like in a small meeting room). (Sarah Hutchins 1/28/16)

Perhaps in future iterations there can be a sound indicator to help find it. Or the buzz feature can be accentuated with a “find my lift” tracker function similar to the iPhone one. (Kingofclowntopia 7/28/15)

.

22. (MED) Unable to set or change date within app

Time traveling – I really like this. It helps me stay awake in my classes and sitting up straighter makes me pay more attention. The biggest problem is that the app thinks it’s February 3rd when today is the 12th. I can’t find any way to change that and it’s pretty obnoxious really. How to i get Back to the Future, doc?! (Marie Scholl 2/12/16)

App is not saving data from past days Even though I wear and sync my lumo loft everyday the app is not saving the data. Right now when I click to see the previous days step count and good posture hours it shows the previous day as January 28th (Maddie Pearson 2/9/16)

.

23. (MED) No feedback when the app is left open on the “Test delay” screen

…it is really hard to calibrate this thing. The app is supposed to have a screen that IMO is incorrectly hidden behind “Test the Delay” button.And there is a glitch – if you leave/forget the app in the “Test delay” screen (which actually is hte only screen where you get live feedback whether Lumo thinks you are standing up tall or slouching) your Lumo stops giving you feedback…” (Py 6y 8/26/15)

.

24. (LOW) Sensor disconnects without warning

Why do I have to keep entering all my info every time I get disconnected. I don’t understand why I have to sign back out to reconnect!!?? (Jpark1031 2/2/16 iPhone)

About 5 or 6 times a day the sensor disconnects and then it forces me to not only log out, but there is no ‘remember me’ button which is a pain….Then it makes you go through the ENTIRE setup process over and over again. I know how to realign the lift, thank you very much. (iiiLover 9/12/15 iPhone)

.

25. (LOW) Posture data lost on sync

Put the lift on when he went on a run, maybe because the lift was constantly pressed by the seatbelt, got an error message when he linked to his phone. It was showing yesterday’s stats and he thought everything was lost, but after a couple of minutes, his steps showed up (Tester 3)

.

26. (LOW) Coach switches off without warning

My only criticism thus far is that the posture coach will switch to off for no apparent reason. I believe this is an issue with the app, not device though. (Alyana 2/18/16)